Annual Europe Senior Trip stirs unrest as numerous terrorist attacks occur in the continent

Annual Europe Senior Trip stirs unrest as numerous terrorist attacks occur in the continent

Double Byline: Written by Surina Khurana (skhurana.gazette@gmail.com) and Natasha Chanda (nchanda.gazette@gmail.com)

   For as long as students, parents and teachers can remember, the Granite Bay High School senior class has been provided with an opportunity to tour a few of the many European countries during the summer after they graduate.

  The Europe trip, organized by Education First (EF) Tours, usually departs during June and costs around $4800 per student. That price includes the flight, hotels, transportation and all meals except lunch.  

  Next year, students of the class of 2017 are scheduled to depart for Lisbon on June 10, 2017 and return on June 26, 2017 from Lucerne, totalling about 17 days with approximately one or two days in each city.

  The tour is scheduled to stop at Lisbon, Costa del Sol, Madrid, Prado, Barcelona, French Riviera, Monaco, Cinque Terre, Morocco, Venice and Lucerne, with some smaller stops along the way.

  Seniors are encouraged to go on this trip by Mike Valentine and Brandon Dell’Orto, two of Granite Bay High’s Advanced Placement history teachers and the trip chaperones.

  They emphasize that this tour may be the last opportunity many of these seniors will have to see such as vast amount of Europe at one time.

   “For a lot of the kids, this might be there one time in their life to go to Europe,” Dell’Orto said. “They probably won’t go again.”

  The circumstances regarding this year’s enrollment, however, have proven to be slightly different than past years for one particular reason.

  In recent months, the European continent has faced multiple terror attacks, raising a concern of safety and security for students who are considering going on the trip.

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Former GBHS alumni runs for California State Assembly

Former GBHS alumni runs for California State Assembly

  Granite Bay High School has a number of notable alumni and this upcoming election could potentially add another one to its growing list.

  Kevin Kiley, who graduated as the GBHS valedictorian in 2003, is running for California State Assembly in the 2016 election.

  After graduating from Harvard University after high school, Kiley moved on to earn a law degree at Yale University and then a master’s in secondary education from Loyola Marymount University.

  After graduating from LMU, Kevin made use of his law degree and became the Deputy Attorney General.

  He began campaigning as the republican candidate for state assembly in 2015 with the help of a number of current GBHS students.

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Spring 2016 Reflection

May 2016


In the 2015-2016 school year, as part of the Gazette staff, I have learned the key parts of being an editor and how to work programs such as InDesign, Adobe Illustrator and Adobe Photoshop. Time management was another key skill I learned in the process of being an editor. It quickly became evident that waiting until the last minute for stories would be much more difficult while also having to edit two pages in the Lifestyle section of the newspaper.

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Voting concerns regarding young adults in the state of California

Voting concerns regarding young adults in the state of California

  There are independent voters and the American Independent Party.

  Oddly enough, there’s a difference, which a majority of California registered voters failed to notice.

  A recent Los Angeles Times investigation discovered that in an AIP poll, 73 percent of Californians who registered as part of the American Independent Party were unaware of what it actually was.

  In the efforts to register as independent voters, they checked the American Independent Party box, assuming it was indicative of liberty from any particular political party.

  The AIP, however, is defined as a far right political party of the United States, which in many cases is the exact opposite of what these Californians intended to register as.

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The Class of 2017 experiences numerous changes in their high school career

The Class of 2017 experiences numerous changes in their high school career

  Common Core, new UC applications,  AP test changes, unblocked history classes, the new SAT. The list gets dangerously long.

  The class of 2017 at Granite Bay High School has had to face a numerous amount of changes in their high school career.

  It all started when it was announced that Advanced Placement United States History and Advanced Placement Language and Composition would be unblocked for the first time, meaning that one course would be administered in the fall, and the other in the spring.

  In the past, the classes were at the same time, and they were taken over the span of the full school year.

  As a result many students ended up taking the Sierra College substitute for the APUSH course so they would not have to worry about taking the course in the fall and not being prepared for the AP test in the spring.

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Scholarship opportunities are overlooked in the frenzy of college acceptances

Scholarship opportunities are overlooked in the frenzy of college acceptances

  Applications are on their journey back home from college admissions offices around the world and seniors are quickly figuring out the next step in their educational journey.

  An aspect of applying to college that students may forget about in the frenzy of being accepted into the college of their dreams is applying for scholarships afterwards.

  “College these days is so expensive,” senior Ivy Liu said. “I don’t want to be in debt later on, and it is going to be hard finding a job while managing my studies, so scholarships are much needed.”

  College can be a tremendous expense, so taking advantage of scholarships can be beneficial for lessening any financial burden.

  Of course, the usual local and academic scholarships are always available to everybody, but students would be surprised at the amount of non-academic and non-sports related scholarships available to seniors and older students.

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The new SAT raises concern regarding the lack of study materials and the shift in content

The new SAT raises concern regarding the lack of study materials and the shift in content

    The SAT is one of those things almost every high schooler experiences during their educational career. Along with AP classes and Honors courses, it is just as important of a factor in the admissions process for colleges.

  Up until 2005, the SAT had been scored on a 1600 point scale, consisting of one 800 point math section and one 800 point verbal section.

 However, a separate writing section was then added, making the test out of a possible 2400 points. For the past few years, the SAT has been scored on this scale, with a possible 800 points in three categories – math, reading, and writing.

    In 2015, The College Board decided to revert to the original format of one math section and a combined reading and writing section, which once again brought it back to a total of 1600 points.

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